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About Us

Samara Canada is dedicated to reconnecting citizens to politics. Established as a charity in 2009, we have become Canada’s most trusted, non-partisan champion of increased civic engagement and a more positive public life.

Samara Canada’s research and educational programming shines new light on Canada’s democratic system and encourages greater political participation across the country to build better politics, and a better Canada, for everyone.  

A samara is the winged “helicopter" seed that falls from the maple tree. A symbol of Canada, it is also a reminder that from small seeds, big ideas can grow.

Our Work

Research

Samara Canada’s research is the basis for all we do—it helps us identify problems with Canada’s political system and propose solutions. Through our research we explore and expose how Canada’s democracy works in a rigorous, accessible and innovative way. The conversations provoked by Samara’s research help Canadians to better understand and contribute to renewing politics.

Engagement Programming

The Democracy Talks program is based on a simple premise: our democracy is healthiest when people’s voices are heard. Emerging in 2011 from focus groups from across the country and the expressed needs of community groups to better educate Canadians about their role in the political process, Democracy Talks is, at its heart, a facilitated conversation, taking place within established peer groups, which encourages those who’ve never had a political conversation to start talking about politics.

The Everyday Political Citizen project celebrates the unsung heroes of Canadian democracy. At a time when many Canadians are disengaging from politics, this project highlights the regular people who are making their communities better every day. By profiling role models from across the country, Samara Canada hopes to encourage Canadians to increase their own political participation.

Our Impact

 Media Coverage: Our research findings are extensively reported on in media outlets across the country, provoking national conversations.

Education: Our work has been incorporated and adapted into educational materials for high-school and university classrooms. 

Inform Legislation: Our research is cited in legislation currently before the House of Commons, and we have been invited to Parliamentary Committee to give expert testimony. 

Positive Social Effects: Through our programming, people find out that talking about politics and democracy can be fun, countering the reflexive negative association many Canadians have with our political system. In many cases, our programs have a transformative effect on people’s perception of their own participation in Canadian civic life.

Get Involved

Samara Canada is lucky to be part of a community—both online and off—of Canadians committed to improving politics for everyone. We enrich our community by producing content and sharing the thoughts of others on the Samara blog, hosting live events and engaging in constructive online discussion on issues that matter.

There are many ways you can get involved with Samara. We hope you will take a look around our site, engage with us through TwitterFacebook, and the comments section on our Blog.

Our work relies on the generous contributions from our funders, partners and volunteers

Make a donation today for better politics.

 

 


Samara Blog

  • December 19, 2014

    Friday Fill(ibuster): Staff picks!

    We try to keep our finger on the pulse of the debate in this country and further abroad. At the end of the year, it’s time to take a step back and share with you the pieces of writing that have most influenced our thinking about politics and democracy over the last year.
  • December 18, 2014

    Bringing back the political animal, part 3

    Today’s guest blog comes to us from PhD student David Moscop. In his first post, Moscrop outlined the problem of electoral decline in Canada and explained why the targeted solutions of proportional representation and mandatory voting are inadequate. In this second post, he explores what a holistic response to electoral decline could look like.
  • December 16, 2014

    Bringing back the political animal, part 2

    Today’s guest blog comes to us from PhD student David Moscop. In his first post, Moscrop outlined the problem of electoral decline in Canada and explained why the targeted solutions of proportional representation and mandatory voting are inadequate. In this second post, he explores what a holistic response to electoral decline could look like.